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Search results on 10/31/14

5640. Rasmussen, P.E.. 1976. Nitrogen and sulfur fertilization effects on water relations and growth of non-irrigated white wheat.. OR Agr. Exxpt. Sta. Special Report 459, p. 17.

5694. Rasmussen, P.E., D.E. Wilkins and C.L. Douglas Jr.. 1985. Annual-crop spring barley response to nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorus.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 738, p. 33-34.
Annual cropping is often possible where annual precipitation exceeds 14 inches. It is recommended on soils less than 4 ft deep since the soil profile normally is filled by a single winter's rainfall. Rotation of winter wheat with a spring cereal is often preferred to continuous winter wheat because weed control is easier and stubble more manageable. Fertilizer needs increase sharply under annual cropping because nutrient buildup by fallowing is eliminated and competition for nutrients by residue-decomposing organisms is more intense. In this study, nitrogen, phosphorous and sulfur response by spring barley was determined for annual-crop conventional and minimum tillage.

953. Bolton, F.E.. 1984. Sulfur response trial - 1983. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report #713, p.26-27.
A trial was established on the Moro Station in the fall of 1982 with four levels of sulfur and two levels of nitrogen. Sulfur increased grain yield when no N was applied. There was no additional yield increase above 9 lb S/ac. Positive response to sulfur at low nitrogen levels was an indication that sulfur is near the critical level. The addition of small amounts of sulfur (10-15 lb/ac) may be good insurance for sustaining high yield levels.

3725. Koehler, F.E.. 1959. Fertilizer interactions in wheat producing areas of eastern Washington.. Proceedings, 10th Ann. Fert. Conf. PNW, Tacoma, WA, p.19-21.
The most frequently observed nutrient interaction in the wheat producing area of eastern Washington is that between sulfur and nitrogen under annual cropping. Where no sulfur was added, yields were increased by about 8 bushels per acre, and 30 lbs N/ac resulted in slightly better yields than did 120 lbs. When one lb sulfur was added per acre, yield increases from nitrogen were about 15 bu/ac, and again there was little difference between the effects of 30 and 120 lbs of N. However, where the sulfur rate was 10 lbs/ac, the yield increase with 30 lb N was 20 bu/ac and that with 120 lb N was 30 bu/ac. In no case did sulfur alone appreciably increase yields.

5463. Pumphrey, F.V. and P.E. Rasmussen. 1982. Winter wheat fertilization in the Northwest intermountain region.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta., Circular #691. OSU, Corvallis, OR..
Most dryland wheat needs 40-100 lb/ac N. Early spring applications of N are 50% more efficient. Most wheat fields also need S. Most soils do not need P, but if needed half as much P needs to be applied if drilled with seed versus seperate application. T: N fertilizer effect on yield. N and S in grain and straw of a 50 and 125 bushel crop. Yields of wheat fertilized with different sources and forms of N. Soil N in non-fertilized soil as influenced by soil depth and sampling from planting to harvest. Soil N as influenced by soil depth, time of sampling, and fertilizer applications.

5632. Ramig, R.E., P.E. Rassmussen, R.R. Allmaras and C.M. Smith.. 1975. Nitrogen - sulfur relations in soft winter wheat. I. Yield response to fertilizer and residual sulfur.. Agronomy J. 67(2):219-223.
This study measured yield response of wheat to S applied with a range of N for the first crop and monitored residual S effects on yields of 3 subsequent crops. Significant N to S relationships were found. The first crop did not respond to S when N was deficient or optimal. Residual S increased straw yield in all crops and grain yield in 1 of 4 trials for the second crop, 3 of 3 trials for the third crop, and 2 of 2 trials for the fourth crop. Wheat response to residual S was influenced by N rates applied to the first wheat crop. High N and S fertilization resulted in early drought and lower yelds. Gradual release of residual S from recent organic matter apparently provided S at a rate adequate for efficient water use and maximum yield. T: Grain and straw yield response to S and N in first through fourth wheat crop following fertilization. The initial and residual effects of S on grain yield of wheat receiving optimum N.

5684. Rasmussen, P.E. and R.R. Allmaras. 1986. Sulfur fertilization effects on winter wheat yield and extractable sulfur in semiarid soils.. Agronomy J. 78: 421-425.
Wheat yield in response to S was affected by yield level, intesity of cropping, and S accumulation in calcic horizons. At noncalcareous wheat-fallow sites with little S accumulation within 1.8 m of the surface, progressive downward movement of S occurred over 4 yrs. At an annual crop site with a calcic horizon, substantial yield responses to residual S occurred 25 yrs after application of 270-1570 kg S/ha. The highest fertilizer use efficiency was by fertilizing every 2nd crop with 14 kg S/ha when soil tests and yield data indicate a S deficiency. T: S and N fertilization effects on grain yield and S uptake by winter wheat. Extractable S in the upper 0.6 m of soil 2 and 4 yrs after S application. Cumulative plant uptake and extractable S in soil 1 and 4 yrs after S application. Extractable S in soil profile 25 yrs after S application ceased. Wheat yield response 1960-75, as affected by S applied between 1931-50.

5744. Rasmussen, P.E., R.E. Ramig, R.R. Allmaras and C.M. Smith.. 1975. Nitrogen - sulfur relations in soft white winter wheat. II. Initial and residual effects of sulfur application on nutrient uptake and N/S ratio.. Agronomy J. 67(2):224-228.
This study determined S and N uptake and distribution in soft white winter wheat fertilized with S in combination with deficient, optimum, and excessive N. Residual uptake from 17, 34, and 68 kg of applied S/ha was evaluated in 3 subsequent wheat crops receiving optimum N fertilization. S uptake and concentration in the first crop was proportional to the rate applied, but accumulated primarily in vegetative tissue when present in excess of the amount required for grain protein. Uptake from residual S was lower than from applied S. Grain yield responses to S were poorly correlated with S concentration or N/S ratios in tissue, because of inconsistancy of S accumulation in plant parts and the dominant effect of N on yield. T: Effect of N and S fertilization on S concentration and uptake at 3 stages of growth in a first wheat crop. Effect of residual S on grain yield and S concentration in grain and straw of second, third, and fourth crops. Relationship between S concentration in mature whole plants and grain yield receiving optimum N fertilization.

8412. Pumphrey, F.V. and P.E. Rasmussen. 1982. Winter wheat fertilization in the northeast intermountain region of Oregon.. OSU AES Circular of Information 691, OSU, Corvallis, OR.
Early spring application of N is more effective than preplant. Rates can be reduced up to 50%. Most wheat needs S fertilizer (15-30 lb/ac) if N is added. Most soils supply enough P for high yields. There have not been significant yield responses to potassium or trace elements.

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