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Search results on 10/26/14

7533. Whittlesey, N.K. and R.E. Oehlschlaeger. 1969. Cost of production budgets for dryland crops in eastern Washington.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Circular #501.
Detailed estimates for 10 regions. T: over 44

2625. Hoag, D., H. Hinman and T. Hoffman. 1984. 1984 costs of alternative tillage systems, Central Whitman Co., WA. WSU Ext. Serv., Ext. Bull. #850.
Compares the cost of conventional and minimum tillage for a summer fallow-winter wheat-spring barley rotation. 15 to 18 inches of annual precip.

3054. Swanson, J.. 1956. Estimated operating costs and investment needed to produce wheat in eastern Lincoln County.. WA Agr. Expt. Sta. Circular #308.
This average farm produces 40 bu/ac with fertilizer and 30 bu/ac without. It is estimated that about half the farms in the area are using fertilizer. Total operating cost is $13.45 per acre not including interest on investment or operating capital, taxes, insurance, and building maintenance costs. This report does give breakdown of costs of oil, grease, fuel, repairs, fertilizer, herbicides, seed, and labor. Circular 309 gives same profile for eastern Klickitat County, WA. T: operating costs and labor requirements per acre for summer fallow; operating costs and labor requirements per acre for wheat production following summer fallow.

3098. Swanson, Guy. 1990. Annual production of spring wheat in Montana and the Columbia Basin. Bumper Times special edition, Jan. 31, 1990; p. 6; S. 4305 University Rd., Spokane, WA 99206.
Minimum till continuous spring wheat produced the highest net returns in a Montana study. The cost of Roundup reduced net returns in no-till, although no-till had the highest gross returns. John Rae, a WA farmer, has compared continuous no-till spring wheat with his normal winter wheat-fallow system. The continuous system has produced $350/ac more gross returns over five years in his 9" rainfall area.

5152. Peterson, C.L., E.L. Michalson, and K.N. Hawley. 1988. Minimum input wheat production.. Amer. Soc. Agric. Engineers Paper 88-1058.
The paper describes a computer decision support program under development at the University of Idaho to help growers determine the most economic levels of inputs. It focuses on machinery decisions and fertilizers, but requests information regarding all aspects of farm management. It can produce "what-if" scenarios, examining different production strategies under various price conditions. Minimum input farming is particularly concerned with front-end capital requirements. It is an expansion of minimum tillage to include variables beyond yield and erosion as measures of success. Lack of adequate production functions relating tillage, fertilizer and pesticide use to crop yield are a major limitation. The Idaho fertilizer guide was not useful. Two MIF field plots were set up to test the program, using reduced fertilizer and reduced tillage for MIF. Costs of production were reduced on the MIF plots, which had net returns of $0.53/bu versus $0.33/bu for the conventional plots. Most of the gain was due to the reduction in phosphate fertilizer.

7733. Young, D.L. and W. Goldstein. 1988. How government farm programs discourage sustainable cropping systems: a U.S. case study.. How systems work: Proc. Farming Systems Research Symp. 1987.
Compares enterprise budgets for wheat production in the Palouse of a conventional systems using normal fertilizers and pesticides with a PALS rotation using black medic and limited pesticides. Costs per acre were $130 for conventional and $57 for PALS, with net returns higher for PALS under all scenarios except a high yield site with government price supports. PALS became more profitable than conventional with wheat at $3.50/bu for a high yield site and at $5.00/bu for a low yield site.

10814. Heim, M., R.J. Cook, and D.J. Kirpes. 1986. Economic benefits and costs of biological control of take-all to the Pacific Northwest wheat industry.. Research Bulletin 0988, Agr. Res. Center, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA.
Take-all can severely lower wheat yields. One possible control is through the use of antagonistic Pseudomonad bacteria applied to wheat seed. Disease surveys in the region verified increased disease problems with grain intensive rotations and with reduced till or no-till farming. Overall, an estimate 600,000 acres are affected by take-all in the region. Estimates of the cost of a commercial bacterial seed treatment were $14.30/ac applied. Wheat yields were assumed to increase an average of 5-10% from this. At a wheat price of $3.00/bu, a minimum 5 bu/ac increase is needed to break even on the treatment.

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