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Search results on 10/30/14

5981. Rovira, A.D.. 1986. Influence of crop rotation and tillage on Rhizoctonia bare patch of wheat.. Phytopathology, 76(7):669-673.
Rhizoctonia bare patch was more severe in direct drilled wheat than in wheat sown into cultivated soil. The area of affected crop was consistently larger when wheat followed a mixed annual pasture of grasses and Medicago spp. than when wheat followed wheat, peas, or grass-free pasture of Medicago spp. All isolates of R. solani were pathogenic on wheat, barley, peas, Medicago spp., annual ryegrass, and barley grass.

6359. Smiley, R., D. Wilkins, W. Uddin, S. Ott, K. Rhinhart, and S. Case. 1989. Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat and barley.. OR Agr. Expt. Sta. Special Report 840, p. 68-79..
Rhizoctonia root rot is now considered the most severe root disease of barley in the PNW. It is more important than take-all and Pythium on wheat produced in drier areas (<16" precip.). Based on long-term plots at Pendleton, different management systems are unlikely to greatly influence the biological resistance of soils to Rhizoctonia. Rotational crops susceptible to Rhizoctonia include wheat, barley, peas, chickpeas, lentils, and rapeseed. The disease is less apparent on small grains after legumes than after cereals. Rhizoctonia damage is always highest on no-till systems, but yields may not suffer due to improved water relations under conservation tillage. Australian research indicates that applications of N and P fertilizers can reduce the disease. There appear to be detrimental herbicide interactions with Rhizoctonia, particularly Glean on high pH soils. Also, the use of glyphosate increased disease incidence, perhaps by signalling the pathogens to move from the dying plants to newly seeded ones. A delay of at least 2 weeks is suggested between chem kill and planting of a new crop.

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